lunes, 21 de mayo de 2018

Years in the making: How the risk for Alzheimer’s disease can be reduced | Health.mil

Years in the making: How the risk for Alzheimer’s disease can be reduced | Health.mil

health dot mil banner image



Years in the making: How the risk for Alzheimer’s disease can be reduced

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 5.5 million Americans, up to 1.7 percent of the population, may have Alzheimer’s disease. Symptoms such as memory problems, impaired reasoning or judgment, vision or spatial issues, and difficulty finding words can indicate early stages of the disease. (U.S. Army graphic)

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 5.5 million Americans, up to 1.7 percent of the population, may have Alzheimer’s disease. Symptoms such as memory problems, impaired reasoning or judgment, vision or spatial issues, and difficulty finding words can indicate early stages of the disease. (U.S. Army graphic)







From forgetting names to repeating questions, or having trouble remembering a recent event, growing older presents some challenges for an aging mind. But these symptoms can be an indication of something much more serious: Alzheimer’s disease.
Army Maj. Abraham Sabersky, a staff neurosurgeon at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, said Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and the sixth leading cause of death for Americans.
“The health of our service members and veterans is the paramount mission of the Military Health System,” said Sabersky. “Given Alzheimer's prevalence in the general population, I believe that it is important that we highlight the lifestyle modifications that can prevent this debilitating illness.”
Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease that affects the brain’s ability to retain new information. The result is often noticed as “memory problems.” The National Institute of Aging, or NIA, defines the disease in three stages: mild, moderate, and severe. Symptoms develop slowly but get worse over time.
As early symptoms begin to appear, people can seem healthy but may have trouble with processing, remembering, or showing good judgment. According to the NIA, some emerging signs of Alzheimer’s include memory loss, getting lost in familiar settings, difficulty with money and bills, and taking longer to complete everyday tasks. The disease can become severe enough to limit a person’s ability to carry on a conversation or respond to the surrounding environment, said Sabersky.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said an estimated 5.5 million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease in 2017. Risk factors include aging, diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, and family history. The CDC said symptoms usually begin after age 60, but Alzheimer’s disease likely starts a decade or more before problems become apparent to others.
“There appears to be a link between repeated head injuries and certain forms of dementia, which can overlap with the symptoms of Alzheimer's,” said Sabersky, referring to a 2014 study published by the American Academy of Neurology. The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that more than 750,000 veterans have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, he added
“Veterans who experienced brain trauma in the course of their service can be at higher risk for developing the disease,” said Sabersky. “The diagnosis PTSD has also been associated with an increased risk of developing dementia later in life.”
While no cure has been found, various types of medication are available to help lessen symptoms and improve quality of life. Sabersky said extensive interest in the subject has led to new research findings being released consistently over time.
Army Maj. Joetta Khan, registered dietitian at Walter Reed, said risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are similar to heart disease.
“There is a growing body of evidence that diet, exercise, and other interactions within one’s environment could alter brain health and mental function,” said Khan. Exercise seems to play a relevant role in brain health. Many observational studies have shown a decreased risk of dementia in people who exercise, she added.
Healthy lifestyle habits, including exercise, proper nutrition, sleep, stress management, and being active, have shown the greatest benefit for preventing and slowing the progression of Alzheimer's, said Sabersky.
“Keeping physically active and eating a balanced diet should be a priority with aging,” said Khan, adding that although bodies begin to slow down, they are influenced by behaviors. “Understanding the connection between a healthy lifestyle and brain health is essential to increasing not only our quantity (years) of life, but also the quality of those years.”


Making behavioral health care easy

Article
5/11/2018
Army Staff Sgt. Michael McMillan (right), 35th Infantry Division behavioral health noncommissioned officer in charge, confers with Army Capt. Trever Patton, 35th ID psychologist, in Kuwait. Embedded behavioral health teams are a key part of providing easy access to care for service members. (Army photo by Staff Sgt. Tina Villalobos)
Embedded behavioral health teams let service members easily access behavioral health care right in their unit areas
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Mental Wellness

Ready, set, focus: Finding calm in a storm through the power of breathing

Article
4/23/2018
Airmen and Soldiers practice breathing and relaxation during their off duty time in a deployed location. Stress can take its toll on your mental and physical health, including your heart health, but there are breathing techniques to buffer yourself from it. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Lance Cheung)
‘Mindful minutes’ and deep breathing help on the job, airmen say
Recommended Content:
Preventive Health | Mental Wellness | Health Readiness

Military providers seek tailored approach to treating PTSD

Article
3/14/2018
The VA/DoD clinical practice guideline for managing post-traumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder recommends against prescribing benzodiazepines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Pick)
New tool reviews, monitors provider prescribing habits
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Traumatic Brain Injury and the Art of Paddling

Article
3/7/2018
Collins enjoys stand-up paddle boarding for how it helps him with TBI. His service dog, Charlie, likes it too. (Courtesy Photo by U.S. Army Special Operations veteran Josh Collins)
A U.S. Army veteran’s recipe for embracing life after several TBIs
Recommended Content:
Mental Wellness | Hearing Loss | Men's Health | Physical Activity | Physical Disability | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Traumatic Brain Injury | Vision Loss

New DoD educational podcast series promotes better health

Article
3/5/2018
The Defense Health Agency’s instructional podcasts highlight health technology and offer tips, tools and techniques to help improve the lives of those in the military community.
The instructional podcasts highlight health technology and offer tips, tools and techniques to help improve the lives of those in the military community
Recommended Content:
Preventive Health | Sleep | Mental Wellness

Rocky and Elmo want providers to "Watch. Ask. Share."

Article
2/12/2018
Defense Health Agency Director Vice Admiral Raquel “Rocky” Bono joined Sesame Street’s Elmo to record a welcome video for the new provider section of the Sesame Street for Military Families website. (Photo by MHS Communications)
How DHA teamed with Sesame Street to help care for military families
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Public Health | Preventive Health | Children's Health | Deployment Health

2017 Year in Review: A look at inspiring individuals who help shape the MHS

Article
12/20/2017
Staff Sgt. Matthew Crabtree, a medic with the 285th Medical Company (Area Support) and a registered nurse, performs a medical assessment on an infant less than one month old Oct. 27, 2017, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico. Military medical personnel were critical to disaster response related to hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. (Ohio National Guard photo by Sgt. Joanna Bradshaw)
MHS highlights the contributions of veterans, advocates, providers
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Research and Innovation

Your military family: The key to beating holiday blues

Article
12/20/2017
Airman Adrianna Barelas, 4th Space Operations Squadron system administrator, displays her Grinch side for the holiday season at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Dec. 1, 2017. Many things can cause stress during the holidays, including travel, financial strain from gift buying, and the expectations of friends and family. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class William Tracy)
Lift your mood with healthy basics
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care

Four tips for staying healthy this holiday season

Article
12/15/2017
The simple act of washing your hands will decrease the risk of illness for you and your family this holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Michelle Gigante)
Simple ways to make this the best time of the year for wellness
Recommended Content:
Public Health | Integrative Wellness | Mental Wellness

Print PSA: Expanded Coverage for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders

Publication
11/7/2017
Public service announcement you can print locally to help spread the word about the expanded coverage for mental health and substance use disorders.
Recommended Content:
TRICARE Health Program | Mental Health Care

Into the woods: Does nature nurture healing?

Article
9/29/2017
The Green Road nature site is tucked away on bustling Naval Support Activity Bethesda, Maryland. (Photo courtesy of Uniformed Services University)
The goals of the Green Road project are to provide empirical evidence for the healing power of nature in wounded warriors and their caregivers
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Suicide Prevention

Retired Gen. Ham: I got emotional support. You can, too.

Article
9/14/2017
Then-Brig. Gen. Carter Ham (left) talks with the Army vice chief of staff, Gen. George Casey, after senior military leaders arrive in Mosul, Iraq, in June 2004.  (Courtesy photo)
Army leader got emotional help after Iraq deployment, then earned more stars
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Suicide Prevention

Experts talk knowledge translation benefits for Military Health System

Article
8/30/2017
The Military Health System Research Symposium is Defense Department's premier scientific meeting.
Dr. Richard Stoltz, Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) acting director, introduced the knowledge translation process and how using a systematic approach and best practices can impact military psychological health challenges.
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Research and Innovation

Improve your mental health with time away from work

Article
8/7/2017
A sailor assigned to U.S. Naval Support Facility Diego Garcia relaxes by sailing on a Pico sailboat near the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Marina. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan B. Tabios)
Taking a day off may present challenges, especially if you’re on active-duty, but planning a vacation is a good way to maximize mental health self-care
Recommended Content:
Mental Health Care | Mental Wellness

PTSD treatment confronts the trauma behind the disorder

Article
6/23/2017
Post-traumatic stress disorder is considered one of the “signature wounds” of the current conflicts in the Middle East. But many people may not know that there are highly effective treatments for this invisible wound. Scientifically researched and proven methods for treating PTSD work by getting the patient to confront and learn to process the trauma causing their symptoms. The process can start by talking with anyone, like a health care provider, chaplain or even just a friend. (U.S. Army photo)
Scientifically researched and proven methods for treating PTSD work by getting the patient to confront and learn to process the trauma causing their symptoms
Recommended Content:
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Mental Health Care

1 comentario:

  1. Do you know the 2 biggest reasons men and women stop exercising?

    1) Lack of time
    2) Lack of motivation

    Let's tackle "Lack of Time" today with 5 ways you can get your
    workouts done faster. After all, no one should spend more than 50
    minutes in the gym.

    Here are 5 ways to cut time from your workouts.

    a) Supersets

    I use "non-competing" superset. This means, choose two exercises
    for different muscle groups - and preferably completely opposite
    movements. For example, choose a push and a pull. That way, one
    muscle group rests while the other works...and you cut the rest
    time you need between sets.

    b) Choose a better warm-up strategy

    Don't waste 10 minutes walking on the treadmill. Instead, use a
    total body circuit of bodyweight exercises as a general warm-up, and
    then move directly into specific warm-up sets for your first two
    exercises.

    c) Pair dumbbell and bodyweight exercises together in your
    supersets

    This saves you time at home (you don't need to change the dumbbell
    weight between exercises) and in the gym (you don't need to fight
    for 2 sets of dumbbells).

    d) Choose Intervals over slow cardio

    The latest research shows more weight loss when people use
    intervals, and intervals take half as long to do.

    e) Limit the use of isolation exercises

    Pick multi-muscle exercises, such as squats, pulls, pushes, and
    rows. If you have time, you can squeeze in some dropsets for arms
    and shoulders if you want. However, if you only have 3 sessions of
    45 minutes per week, isolation exercises must be the first to go.

    In addition, don't spend more than 10 minutes per week on direct ab
    training. It's not efficient and won't give you rock hard abs
    alone.

    Get your very own copy of Turbulence Training & the Nutrition Guide here: ===> 5 Ways to Cut Your Workout Time <=====

    Workout less, live life more,

    Craig Ballantyne, CTT
    Certified Turbulence Trainer
    Creator of Turbulence Training

    PS - Don't know where to start?

    If you are a beginner, start by reading Dr. Mohr's nutrition
    guidelines...eating properly will be the biggest factor in your
    early success.

    Beginners should also start with the Introductory TT workouts to
    prepare their muscles for the upcoming intense training.

    For others, it's best to start with the Intermediate Level TT
    workouts. If those aren't enough of a challenge, you can move onto
    the Original TT workout and follow the 16-week advanced program
    right through.

    If at any time you need a break, try the TT Bodyweight 4-week plan.

    And then finish off with the TT Fusion Fat Loss program followed by
    the 30-day Maximum Fat Loss program to cap off a full 24 weeks of
    Advanced TT fat loss workouts.

    After that, choose between the TT for Women or TT for Muscle
    programs to help put the finishing touches on your physique. All of
    these are included as bonuses with Turbulence Training.

    Get started on the road to fat loss with your very own copy of
    Turbulence Training, ALL of the bonuses, & the Nutrition Guide here: ===> Fast fat loss workouts... <=====

    ResponderEliminar