sábado, 24 de diciembre de 2016

CDC Allocates $184 Million for Zika Protection

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CDC Allocates $184 Million for Zika Protection

Funds are earmarked for states, territories, local health departments and universities
By Robert Preidt
Thursday, December 22, 2016
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THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly $184 million has been earmarked to protect Americans against Zika virus infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday.
The funding will go to states, territories, local governments and universities. It's part of $350 million awarded to the CDC by Congress earlier in 2016 for Zika response and preparedness, the agency said.
"Zika continues to be a threat to pregnant women," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release. "States, territories, and communities need this CDC funding to fight Zika and protect the next generation of Americans."
Zika exposure in pregnancy can cause microcephaly -- which leads to an abnormally small brain and head -- and other serious birth defects. Also, some adults develop a rare neurological disorder called Guillain-Barre syndrome.
The CDC said the supplemental funds will help states control mosquitoes and beef up communication to the public and health care providers about Zika concerns.
Other priorities include: sending emergency response teams to states with Zika outbreaks; improving laboratory-testing capacity; and providing a framework for tracking pregnancies and births affected by Zika, the CDC said.
The CDC said $25 million will be awarded to 21 communities at greatest risk of Zika infection so they can rapidly identify, investigate and contain any virus cases.
Four universities will receive $10 million each for Zika research. They are the University of Florida, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y.
Nearly $100 million will go to 58 state, territorial, city, and local public health departments, the agency said.
Zika spreads to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito, but can also be transmitted by infected people to their sex partners. There is no vaccine or treatment for Zika.
The most common symptoms are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes), but many people infected with Zika have no symptoms.
Pregnant women and women planning to become pregnant should protect themselves from mosquito bites, avoid traveling to areas with Zika virus, and take precautions if having sex with someone who has traveled to an area where Zika is circulating, the CDC said.
So far, the only mainland states that have reported Zika transmission from a mosquito to a human are Florida and Texas.
SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Dec. 22, 2016
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1 comentario:

  1. This will make a vaccine much more difficult:

    "We don't know if the vaccines that are currently being developed prevent sexual transmission because the immune response to protect against systemic infection differs from the one in the reproductive tract," says Sujan Shresta, who studies infectious disease at La Jolla. "It's really important to test the vaccines that are being generated in different mouse models." Source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-12/cp-zvi121416.php#.WFnHd-ZelX4.google

    9 Reasons El Niño Did NOT Cause Zika to Spread: http://www.infobarrel.com/No_El_Nio_Did_Not_Cause_Zika_to_Spread_Ill_Tell_You_What_Did

    ResponderEliminar