miércoles, 16 de noviembre de 2016

Tinnitus: MedlinePlus

Tinnitus: MedlinePlus
MedlinePlus Trusted Health Information for You
11/10/2016 04:13 PM EST

Source: American Tinnitus Association
Related MedlinePlus Page: Tinnitus
Illustration of the ear and inner ear anatomy
11/10/2016 04:13 PM EST

Source: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders - NIH
Related MedlinePlus Page: Tinnitus

MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA  

National Institutes of Health

The primary NIH organization for research on Tinnitus is the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Disclaimers

MedlinePlus links to health information from the National Institutes of Health and other federal government agencies. MedlinePlus also links to health information from non-government Web sites. See our disclaimer about external links and our quality guidelines.

Summary

Tinnitus is often described as a ringing in the ears. It also can sound like roaring, clicking, hissing, or buzzing. It may be soft or loud, high pitched or low pitched. You might hear it in either one or both ears.
Millions of Americans have tinnitus. People with severe tinnitus may have trouble hearing, working or even sleeping.
Causes of tinnitus include
  • Hearing loss in older people
  • Exposure to loud noises
  • Ear and sinus infections
  • Heart or blood vessel problems
  • Meniere's disease
  • Brain tumors
  • Hormonal changes in women
  • Thyroid problems
  • Certain medicines
Treatment depends on the cause. Treatments may include hearing aids, sound-masking devices, medicines, and ways to learn how to cope with the noise.
NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Start Here

Latest News

Prevention and Risk Factors

Treatments and Therapies

Related Issues

Health Check Tools

Statistics and Research

Clinical Trials

Find an Expert

Children

Patient Handouts

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada