lunes, 28 de noviembre de 2016

Tips to treat tendonitis | Health.mil

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Tips to treat tendonitis | Health.mil

Tips to treat tendonitis

Nearly 90 Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps freshman midshipman candidates stretch their legs during their introduction to unit physical training at Camp Navajo, Arizona, during joint New Student Orientation.

Nearly 90 Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps freshman midshipman candidates stretch their legs during their introduction to unit physical training at Camp Navajo, Arizona, during joint New Student Orientation. If you’ve ever trained for Physical Fitness (PFT) and Physical Readiness (PRT) tests, a long-distance race, or other exercise routines, you’ve likely experienced pain. It might be a common, chronic overuse injury known as tendonitis. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Brian A. Tuthill)

IF you’ve ever trained for Physical Fitness (PFT) and Physical Readiness (PRT) tests, a long-distance race, or other exercise routines, you’ve likely experienced pain. It might be a common, chronic overuse injury known as tendonitis. The good news is there are things you can to do to help reduce your risk of tendonitis. 
Tendons connect your muscles to your bones and help you move by “pulling” on the bones when your muscles contract. Damage or inflammation can occur from repetitive activities, motions, or sudden movements that put too much stress on your tendons. Knees, elbows, and wrists are all common areas of pain associated with tendonitis because they’re often used in repetitive movements. 
Pay attention to your body. Warning signs can include pain, swelling, and loss of range of motion. Here are some tips to help prevent tendonitis.
  • Maintain a healthy diet and weight, and check out HPRC’s Nutrition section for helpful nutrition tips. 
  • Pay attention to your posture and make sure that you use proper form, especially when lifting and moving heavy objects. 
  • Maintain a well-rounded exercise routine, which includes muscular fitness, flexibility, mobility, and cardiovascular endurance. 
  • Make sure to incorporate rest and cross-training days to let your body recover. 
Already have tendonitis? Here are some tips to help you get back into your workout routine: 
  • Alternate exercise to rest the affected area. Instead of running, try biking or swimming to rest possible patellar (knee) tendonitis. Visit HPRC’s RX3 Knee Pain section on knee exercises and other rehab resources. 
  • Ice the affected area to reduce pain and swelling. 
  • Ask your healthcare provider about physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications, which also can provide some relief. 
See your doctor right away if you experience fever, redness or warmth in the affected area, or pain in multiple locations. 
Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post

Stay fit during the holidays

Article
11/28/2016
Navy Chief Petty Officer Eduardo Medero, right, takes height and weight measurements from Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Rodney Good during a physical fitness assessment weigh-in. Experts say to keep weight in check. Weigh yourself in the morning, at least once or twice a week, during the holidays. This should enough to notice any slight increase from the week and to keep you in check for the weekend and vice-versa. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Theron J. Godbold)
It seems as if the Thanksgiving-to-New Year's holiday season is one long, tempting food-fest designed to make you gain weight
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Compression garments: Do they work?

Article
11/17/2016
Most studies look at compression socks during running. Compression garments have been shown to help blood flow to working muscles during exercise, but that necessarily doesn’t translate to better performance. (U.S. Navy photo)
Compression garments come in a variety of sleeves, socks, shorts, and full-body suits
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Mixing supplements and medications

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10/20/2016
Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications. In other words, you could be getting too much or too little of the medications that you need, which can be dangerous to your health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)
Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications
Related Topics:Human Performance Resource CenterIntegrative WellnessTRICARE Pharmacy Program

Healthy aging possible for all: Tips to follow

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10/5/2016
Getting regular exercise correlates to better cognitive and physical function in older adults.
Fort Belvoir geriatric physician provides tips on how one can enjoy a healthy lifestyle while getting older.
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EPOC-alypse, now

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10/4/2016
A Soldier does as many pushups as possible during The Black Knight Challenge at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.
Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), also known as “afterburn,” occurs after strenuous exercise as a way to bring your body back to its normal metabolic rate
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Stop shin splints

Article
9/30/2016
U.S. Air Force Airmen run laps around the flightline at Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Georgia. Shin splints – a common injury among athletes, particularly runners – refers to pain in the leg below the knee, usually on the inside part of your shin. This pain can be caused by micro-tears at the bone tissue, possibly caused by overuse or repetitive stress. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Stephen D. Schester)
Shin splints usually occur after sudden changes in exercise or physical activity
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Sunrise Yoga Class

Photo
9/29/2016
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Paradiso participates in a sunrise yoga class on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. If you’re thinking of adding exercise to your pain management plan, consider the following types: aerobic, strength, and flexibility. But make sure your exercise program is specifically tailored to your needs. Some exercises might be easier or more difficult to complete depending upon the type and location of your pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Paradiso participates in a sunrise yoga class on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. If you’re thinking of adding exercise to your pain management plan, consider the following types: aerobic, strength, and flexibility. But make sure your exercise program is specifically tailored to your needs. Some exercises might be easier or more difficult to complete depending upon the type and location of your pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)
Related Topics:Physical ActivityHuman Performance Resource Center

Can exercise relieve chronic pain?

Article
9/29/2016
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tara Paradiso participates in a sunrise yoga class on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. If you’re thinking of adding exercise to your pain management plan, consider the following types: aerobic, strength, and flexibility. But make sure your exercise program is specifically tailored to your needs. Some exercises might be easier or more difficult to complete depending upon the type and location of your pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)
It’s important to know the difference between chronic pain and injury-related pain
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Flag Football Game

Photo
9/28/2016
Youth participate in a flag football game on Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Travis Gershaneck)
Youth participate in a flag football game on Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Travis Gershaneck)
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Do the benefits of sports participation outweigh the risks?

Article
9/28/2016
Youth participate in a flag football game on Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Travis Gershaneck)
Although some wonder if the benefits of children being active in sports outweigh the risks, sports medicine experts encourage parents to consider these points
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Healthy aging starts sooner than you think

Article
9/23/2016
Air Force Staff Sgt. Nick Crouse, a medical technician with the 193rd Special Operations Wing's Medical Group out of Middletown, Pennsylvania, takes the blood pressure of a patient. Heart disease, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are three ailments that take a huge toll on the body as it ages. (U.S. Air Force photo)
Preventive medicine is important for geriatrics
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Vitamin D B12 Deficiency

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9/19/2016
Adequate intake of B vitamins is important to ensure optimum energy production and the building of muscle tissue.
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National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

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9/9/2016
Children play parachute during a fitness-themed event. The festivities were part of a campaign to combat childhood obesity. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Austin May)
The obesity rate in America has doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in 30 years
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Musculoskeletal specialists provide physical training assistance to Soldiers

Article
9/6/2016
A physical therapy assistant demonstrates how the Anti-gravity Treadmill is used during an open house at Martin Army Community Hospital's Physical Therapy Clinic. (U.S. Army photo by Reginald Rogers)
As part of the surgeon general's initiative, the Army has placed individual musculoskeletal care specialists within its training battalions
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September is Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

Article
9/2/2016
Children play basketball at the base gym. Physical activity is important and children learn behaviors from their parents, so be active, walk around the neighborhood, go on a bike ride, or play basketball at the park. Demonstrate the behaviors you want your child to emulate and establish your child's healthy behaviors early. (U.S. Marine Corps photo)
Childhood obesity is a health issue that puts children at risk for health problems
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