martes, 22 de noviembre de 2016

New Treatment for Allergic Response Targets Mast Cells | NC State News | NC State University

New Treatment for Allergic Response Targets Mast Cells | NC State News | NC State University
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Monday, November 21, 2016

Mast Cell-Targeted Treatment for Allergic Diseases Shows Early Promise

In this week’s issue of PNAS, NIAID scientists and colleagues describe a novel potential approach to treat allergic diseases by targeting mast cells, specialized immune cells packed with inflammatory chemicals. In allergy-prone people, the immune system reacts to an allergen by producing IgE antibodies. Mast cells recognize IgE through special receptors on their surfaces. When allergens interact with IgE on the mast cell surface, the cells release their chemicals, which cause allergy symptoms like watery eyes, runny nose, and itching.

In the new study, the researchers used an innovative strategy to block the formation and function of mast cell receptors for IgE, rendering mast cells unresponsive to IgE-mediated activation. Their approach reduced inflammation in a mouse model of allergic dermatitis. The findings support further development of this technology, which potentially could be delivered as an aerosol or topical cream, to treat allergic diseases.


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