domingo, 28 de septiembre de 2014

White House Announces National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria | Digital Press Kit | CDC Online Newsroom

White House Announces National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria | Digital Press Kit | CDC Online Newsroom



Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH
Every day we don’t act to better protect antibiotics will make it harder and more expensive to address drug resistance in the future. Drug resistance can undermine both our ability to fight infectious diseases and much of modern medicine. Patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer, dialysis for renal failure, and increasingly common treatments for diseases such as arthritis depend on antibiotics so common infectious complications can be treated effectively.
We must be diligent stewards of antibiotics, protecting this precious resource in doctor’s offices, homes, and farms, so that they are available to help us, and our children, in the future.
Tom Frieden, MD, MPH - Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


White House Announces National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

One year ago, CDC issued a landmark report sounding the alarm on the top drug-resistant threats to human health. The announcement this morning of the President’s Executive Order and the National Strategy to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria marks the administration’s response to one of the most urgent health threats facing us today – antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria – germs that don’t respond to the drugs designed to kill them – threaten to return us to the time when simple infections were often fatal. Today, antibiotic-resistant bacteria annually cause a minimum of 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths in the United States.
Detecting, preventing and controlling antibiotic resistance requires a coordinated effort. To support the National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, CDC is working to address the threat in these four areas:
  1. Slow the development of resistant bacteria and prevent the spread of resistant infections.
  2. Strengthen national one-health surveillance efforts to combat resistance.
  3. Advance development and use of rapid and innovative diagnostic tests for identification and characterization of resistant bacteria.
  4. Improve international collaboration and capacities for antibiotic resistance prevention, surveillance, control and antibiotic research and development.
These important plans are part of CDC's request for $30 million for CDC's Detect and Protect Initiative and $14 million for the National Healthcare Safety Network to combat resistant bacteria. These strategies and the funds needed to implement them are a down-payment to improve our country’s ability to start tackling our biggest drug-resistant threats. 

Graphics / Images

  • Graphic: Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report 
    Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report.
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: How Antibiotic Resistance Happens 
    How Antibiotic Resistance Happens
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads 
    Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: National Summary Data from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report 
    National Summary Data from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative Collaborative Infographic 
    Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative Collaborative Infographic
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative NHSN Infographic 
    Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative NHSN Infographic
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative Food Infographic 
    Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative Food Infographic
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative Regional Lab Network Infographic 
    Detect and Protect Against Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Initiative Regional Lab Network Infographic
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic:Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work 
    Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE: from the farm to the table
    Antibiotic prescribing rates by state across the U.S. (2012/13*)
  • Graphic: ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE: from the farm to the table 
    ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE: from the farm to the table.
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Photo: CDC’s Kitty Anderson holds up a 96-well plate used for testing the ability of bacteria to growth in the presence of antibiotics.
    CDC’s Kitty Anderson holds up a 96-well plate used for testing the ability of bacteria to growth in the presence of antibiotics.
  • Photo: CDC staff show two plates growing bacteria in the presence of discs containing various antibiotics. The isolate on the left plate is susceptible to the antibiotics on the discs and is therefore unable to grow around the discs. The one on the right has a CRE that is resistant to all of the antibiotics tested and is able to grow near the disks.
    CDC staff show two plates growing bacteria in the presence of discs containing various antibiotics. The isolate on the left plate is susceptible to the antibiotics on the discs and is therefore unable to grow around the discs. The one on the right has a CRE that is resistant to all of the antibiotics tested and is able to grow near the disks.
  • Photo: CDC microbiologist, Tatiana Travis, sets up real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to detect drug-resistant pathogens.
    CDC microbiologist, Tatiana Travis, sets up real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to detect drug-resistant pathogens.
  • Photo: CDC microbiologist, Kitty Anderson, looks at a 96-well plate used for testing the ability of bacteria to growth in the presence of antibiotics.
    CDC microbiologist, Kitty Anderson, looks at a 96-well plate used for testing the ability of bacteria to growth in the presence of antibiotics.
  • Photo: CDC microbiologist, Johannetsy Avillan, holds up a plate that demonstrates the modified Hodge test, which is used to identify resistance in bacteria known as Enterobacteriaceae. Bacteria that are resistant to carbapenems, considered “last resort” antibiotics, produce a distinctive clover-leaf shape.
    CDC microbiologist, Johannetsy Avillan, holds up a plate that demonstrates the modified Hodge test, which is used to identify resistance in bacteria known as Enterobacteriaceae. Bacteria that are resistant to carbapenems, considered “last resort” antibiotics, produce a distinctive clover-leaf shape.
  • Photo: CDC microbiologist, Kitty Anderson, looks at a 96-well plate used for testing the ability of bacteria to grow in the presence of antibiotics.
    CDC microbiologist, Kitty Anderson, looks at a 96-well plate used for testing the ability of bacteria to grow in the presence of antibiotics.
  • Photo: CDC microbiologist, Johannetsy Avillan, holds up a plate that demonstrates the modified Hodge test, which is used to identify resistance in bacteria known as Enterobacteriaceae. Bacteria that are resistant to carbapenems, considered “last resort” antibiotics, produce a distinctive clover-leaf shape.
    CDC microbiologist, Johannetsy Avillan, holds up a plate that demonstrates the modified Hodge test, which is used to identify resistance in bacteria known as Enterobacteriaceae. Bacteria that are resistant to carbapenems, considered “last resort” antibiotics, produce a distinctive clover-leaf shape.
  • Photo: CDC microbiologist, Alicia Shams, demonstrates Klebsiella pneumoniae growing on a MacConkey agar plate. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common Enterobacteriaceae that is drug resistant.
    CDC microbiologist, Alicia Shams, demonstrates Klebsiella pneumoniae growing on a MacConkey agar plate. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common Enterobacteriaceae that is drug resistant.
  • Photo: CDC microbiologist, Valerie Albrecht, holds up two plates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)
    CDC microbiologist, Valerie Albrecht, holds up two plates of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA).
  • Photo: Plates of plates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in CDC’s healthcare-associated infections laboratory.
    Plates of plates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in CDC’s healthcare-associated infections laboratory.
  • Photo: Yellow-green fluorescence of Clostridium difficile under long-wave UV irradiation on a CCFA plate.
    Yellow-green fluorescence of Clostridium difficile under long-wave UV irradiation on a CCFA plate.
  • Graphic: Clostridium difficile Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report 
    Clostridium difficile Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report.
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report 
    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report.
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report 
    Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Summary from 2013 Antibiotic-Resistant Threats Report.
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
  • Graphic: How Antibiotic Resistance Happens 
    How Antibiotic Resistance Happens
    Entire Infographic Adobe PDF file
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