viernes, 19 de diciembre de 2014

New Opportunity: Apply for the Performance Partnership Pilot Today! | SAMHSA Blog

New Opportunity: Apply for the Performance Partnership Pilot Today! | SAMHSA Blog

SAMHSA Headlines



New Opportunity: Apply for the Performance Partnership Pilot Today!



By: Larke N. Huang, Ph.D., Director, Office of Behavioral Health Equity, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Over five million 14-to-24-year-olds in the U.S. are out of school and not working. In many cases, they face the additional challenges of being low-income, homeless, in foster care, or involved in the justice system. Today, in response, five federal agencies are coming together to offer communities support in overcoming the obstacles they face in achieving better outcomes for “disconnected youth,” and those at risk of becoming disconnected.
For the next 100 days (application deadline: March 4. 2015), states, tribes, and municipalities can apply to become a Performance Partnership Pilot (P3). These pilot communities will test innovative, cost-effective, and outcome-focused strategies for improving results for disconnected youth.
Register today for an upcoming webinar to learn more about P3.


This initiative enables up to 10 pilots to blend together funds that they already receive from different discretionary programs administered by the Departments of Education, Labor, and Health and Human Services, the Corporation for National and Community Service, and the Institute for Museum and Library Services.
P3 allows the flexibility to overcome barriers and align program and reporting requirements, to enable applicants to propose the most effective ways to use these dollars. For example, a state, local, or tribal government could propose to blend eligible funds to provide a comprehensive array of behavioral health, educational, employment and independent living services and supports for youth and young adults ages 16-25 who either have or are at risk of developing a serious mental and/or substance use disorder. In addition, pilots will receive start-up grants of up to $700,000.
Government and community partners already invest considerable attention and resources to meet the needs of America’s disconnected youth. However, practitioners, youth advocates, and program administrators on the front lines of service delivery told us that achieving powerful outcomes is still sometimes inhibited by obstacles such as difficulty coordinating the multiple systems that serve youth. P3 responds directly to these challenges by offering more flexibility in exchange for better outcomes.
P3 will give priority to applicants whose proposals draw on existing evidence of what works and show that they will collect and use reliable data for decision-making and accountability. Additionally, applicants that propose to rigorously evaluate at least a component of their pilot will receive competitive preference. In order to look across all pilot sites, the federal agencies will initiate a national P3 evaluation to examine implementation and build the base of knowledge of how to best serve disconnected youth.
In order to test this new authority in diverse environments across America, P3 includes priorities for applicants that propose to serve disconnected youth in rural communities, and applicants that propose to serve disconnected youth in tribal communities.
Applicants will have 100 days to submit their applications. We expect to announce the pilot sites in late spring 2015.
Questions? Contact disconnectedyouth@ed.gov.
Additional Performance Partnership Pilots Resources:

Combining benzodiazepines with other substances raises risks | SAMHSA

Combining benzodiazepines with other substances raises risks | SAMHSA

SAMHSA Headlines



Combining benzodiazepines with other substances raises risks

Thursday, December 18, 2014
Benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam, diazepam, clonazepam and lorazepam, are a class of drugs used to relieve symptoms of anxiety, panic attacks and seizures.  They are usually safe when taken as prescribed and directed under a health professional’s supervision.   However, benzodiazepines can sometimes cause adverse effects – especially if used improperly or in combination with substances like opioid pain relievers or alcohol.
A new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) shows that 32 percent of hospital emergency department visits involving benzodiazepines resulted in serious medical outcomes such as hospitalization (or in rare cases death).
In emergency department visits involving the use of benzodiazepines in combination with opioid pain relievers the risk of a serious outcome rose to 44 percent.  Similarly, 44 percent of emergency department visits associated with the combined use of benzodiazepines and alcohol resulted in serious medical outcomes.  Serious health results occurred in 50 percent of hospital emergency visits involving the combined use of benzodiazepines, opioid pain relievers and alcohol. This report only analyzed emergency department visits invovlving benzodiazepines alcohol and opioids.
SAMHSA’s report also indicates that older patients may be at significantly higher risk for serious health outcomes.  Seventy percent of emergency department visits involving  people aged 65 or older who had combined benzodiazepines with alcohol and opioid pain relievers resulted in serious outcomes, compared to 39 percent of visits involving people aged 12 to 34 using the same combination of substances.
"Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed medications that can benefit some patients but, like all medications they must be properly used and monitored," said SAMHSA’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Elinore McCance-Katz.  “The adverse events being seen in emergency departments are often the result of drug-drug interactions that can occur between benzodiazepines, opioids and alcohol.  Physicians and other prescribers must inform patients taking these medicines of the potential risk of drug interactions that can result in serious adverse events and even death. Healthcare providers and patients must work together to ensure that prescribed medications are taken in a way that maximizes benefits and diminishes risks."
SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Prevention has several initiatives to prevent the misuse of prescription drugs.  These include school-based programs educating parents and students about the potential dangers of misusing prescription drugs.  Other prevention programs provide informational materials to health professionals, including prescribers, on the risk of overprescribing.
SAMHSA grant programs like the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant, and Partnerships for Success, fund a wide variety of programs designed to help prevent prescription drug misuse and abuse, such as ensuring proper training of first responders for drug overdose situations and implementing prescription drug take-back programs for unused medications.
The report entitled, Benzodiazepines in Combination with Opioid Pain Relievers or Alcohol: Greater Risk of More Serious Emergency Department Visit Outcomes is based on findings from the 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) reports.  DAWN is a public health surveillance system that monitored drug-related morbidity and mortality through reports from a network of hospitals across the nation.  In 2011 DAWN reported that there were approximately 5 million substance-related visits to hospital emergency departments.
For more information, contact the SAMHSA Press Office at 240-276-2130.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) that leads public health efforts to advance the behavioral health of the nation. SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities.

Screening Test Finds Drugs That Show Promise Against Ebola: MedlinePlus

Screening Test Finds Drugs That Show Promise Against Ebola: MedlinePlus

A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health




Screening Test Finds Drugs That Show Promise Against Ebola

Researchers uncover 53 potential treatments; all are already FDA approved but need more study for this use
Wednesday, December 17, 2014
HealthDay news image
Related MedlinePlus Pages
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A screening test has identified more than 50 drugs that could be helpful in treating people with Ebola, researchers report.
The drugs, which are already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, all showed promise in preventing the Ebola virus from entering human cells, where it can cause life-threatening infections.
"These drugs are all approved, so they could be deployed quickly if follow-up research proves that they are effective," said study author Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, director of the Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.
The study was published online Dec. 17 in the journal Emerging Microbes and Infections.
The screening test involves a laboratory-engineered fake Ebola virus. The fake virus contains two proteins from the deadly pathogen, but does not include the infectious genetic material that makes Ebola so dangerous, Garcia-Sastre said.
This Ebola-like particle can enter human cells as the actual virus does. It provides a safe and effective way for researchers to test drugs that might block Ebola from entering cells, he said.
"We generate an empty Ebola virus shell that from the outside looks identical to Ebola but can be used outside of biocontainment," Garcia-Sastre said.
Researchers used this fake Ebola virus to screen a panel of 600 FDA-approved drugs. These drugs were originally prepared for a cancer treatment project, according to background information from the study. The researchers also did a follow-up screening on nearly 3,000 compounds, according to the study.
From these samples, the researchers identified 53 drugs with potential. These drugs fall into six different categories, including well-known types like antihistamines, antipsychotics and anticancer/antibiotic medications. Others inhibit cell division or block the female hormone estrogen, according to the researchers.
Drugs that are already on the market could prove useful in stemming the tide of the current Ebola epidemic in West Africa, which has claimed the lives of more than 6,800 people and infected nearly 18,500, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Two medications -- a Japanese influenza drug called favipiravir and an experimental antiviral drug called brincidofivir -- already have been repurposed and used to fight Ebola during this outbreak. "So, there is a chance that other drugs, used for other conditions, will also exist," said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior associate at the UPMC Center for Health Security in Baltimore.
By using drugs that already exist, physicians and researchers have something of a leg-up in terms of how to use them, said Dr. Lee Norman, chief medical officer of the University of Kansas Hospital and an expert on Ebola.
"We know about their safety profile. We know what their toxicities are," Norman said. Also, because the drugs are already FDA-approved, the agency likely will quickly agree to their use against Ebola.
However, Norman and Adalja both noted that these drugs will have to be tested against actual Ebola virus in lab monkeys before they can be used to fight the virus out in the real world.
"It is a leap to go from a cell culture in a lab to a living organism like a monkey or a human," Norman said. "To really get to the final answer on which of these could be helpful, you have to elevate it to testing in nonhuman primates."
Garcia-Sastre agreed that this study is only a starting point.
"We have not discovered here the magic bullet against Ebola. We have a collection of potentially active drugs against Ebola that could have a potential impact in treating people with Ebola," he said. "We hope now these drugs will be tested quickly."
SOURCES: Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, Ph.D., director, Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City; Amesh Adalja, M.D., senior associate, Center for Health Security, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; Lee Norman, M.D., chief medical officer, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City; Dec. 17, 2014, Emerging Microbes and Infections, online
HealthDay
More Health News on:
Ebola
Medicines

Plan Your Event | NIDA for Teens

Plan Your Event | NIDA for Teens



SAMHSA
Get Involved: NIDA's National Drug Facts Week
NDFW Logo

January 26–February 1, 2015
You're invited to participate in the 5th annual National Drug Facts Week, sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). This weeklong health observance is an opportunity for teens to learn the facts about drugs and addiction from scientists and other experts.
Host and promote an event for teens during the week of January 26–February 1, 2015, and help shatter the myths about drugs.
Register your event and receive support from the NIDA staff to plan a successful and engaging event. NIDA staff can help you order science-based materials to complement your event, brainstorm activity ideas, partner with other organizations, and get your event nationally recognized by adding it to the official 2015 map for National Drug Facts Week.
Already planning to host an event?
Follow NIDA on Twitter @NIDAnews and on Facebook atDrug Facts.

NIMH · Medications for Patients with First Episode Psychosis May Not Meet Guidelines

NIMH · Medications for Patients with First Episode Psychosis May Not Meet Guidelines

Logo for the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

An NIH-funded study finds that almost 40 percent of people with first-episode psychosis in community mental health clinics across the country might benefit from medication treatment changes.
Researchers call for more prescriber education – NIH-funded study
 • Press Release
Many patients with first-episode psychosis receive medications that do not comply with recommended guidelines for first-episode treatment , researchers have found. Current guidelines emphasize low doses of antipsychotic drugs and strategies for minimizing the side effects that might contribute to patients stopping their medication. A study finds that almost 40 percent of people with first-episode psychosis in community mental health clinics across the country might benefit from medication treatment changes.
Psychosis is a mental disorder in which thoughts and emotions are impaired and contact with reality is diminished. People experiencing a first episode of psychosis have different treatment requirements than those with multi-episode psychosis. A recent analysis of prescribing patterns for first-episode psychosis suggests that more effort is needed to promote awareness of first episode-specific medication practices at community facilities. The research was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health, and funds from the Recovery Act .
Dr. John Kane of Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine and The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, New York, led the RAISE Early Treatment Program team studying 404 individuals between the ages of 15 and 40 with first-episode psychosis who presented for treatment at 34 community-based clinics across 21 states. The study participants had been treated with antipsychotic drugs for six months or less.
Delbert Robinson, M.D. , of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, Manhasset, New York, and colleagues report their findings on Dec. 4, 2014 in theAmerican Journal of Psychiatry.
The authors identified 159 people (39.4 percent of those enrolled in the study) who might benefit from changes in their medication. Of the 159 patients identified by researchers, 8.8 percent were prescribed higher-than-recommended doses of antipsychotics; 23.3 percent were prescribed more than one antipsychotic; 36.5 percent were prescribed an antipsychotic and an antidepressant without a clear need for the antidepressant; 10.1 percent were prescribed psychotropic medications without an antipsychotic medication; and 1.2 percent were prescribed stimulants. In addition, 32.1 percent were prescribed olanzapine, a medication not recommended for first-episode patients. Some of the 159 fell into multiple categories.
Better medication treatment early in the illness, particularly strategies that minimize uncomfortable side effects, may lead to better results for patients. To improve prescription practices, the authors recommend additional education for those prescribing medication for patients with first-episode psychosis.
The study is among the first of several to report results from theRecovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode (RAISE) project, which was developed by NIMH to examine first-episode psychosis before and after specialized treatment was offered in community settings in the United States. RAISE seeks to change the path and prognosis of schizophrenia through coordinated and intensive treatment in the earliest stages of illness. The findings from these studies identify opportunities for improving the lives of people experiencing first-episode psychosis by highlighting ways existing treatments can be enhanced. For example, the studies make recommendations for improving coordination of mental health care and primary care, and for ensuring that medications follow established guidelines.
“Our data were for prescriptions individuals received before they started the RAISE-Early Treatment Program study. Community mental health clinicians usually have extensive experience treating individuals with multi-episode psychosis,” said Robinson. “The challenge for the field is to develop ways to transmit the specialized knowledge about first episode treatment to busy community clinicians.”
NIMH is working with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to use the RAISE results to improve treatment for people with early onset of serious mental illness – including psychosis. This effort includes all US states and territories via SAMHSA’s Community Mental Health Services Block Grant.

Reference:

Robinson DG, Schooler NR, John M, Correll CU, Marcy P, Addington J, Brunette MF, Estroff SE, Mueser KT, Penn D, Robinson J, Rosenheck RA, Severe J, Goldstein A, Azrin S, Heinssen R, Kane JM. Medication prescription practices for the treatment of first episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders: data from the national RAISE-ETP study, American Journal of Psychiatry, Dec. 4, 2014

Grants:

Contract HHSN-271-2009-00019C and grant P30MH090590 

Clinical trial number(s):

NCT01321177
#
About the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH):The mission of theNIMHis to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery and cure. For more information, visithttp://www.nimh.nih.gov.
About the National Institutes of Health (NIH):NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visithttp://www.nih.gov .
Links:

You Can Manage Your Chronic Pain To Live a Good Life: A Guide for People in Recovery from Mental Illness or Addiction (Spanish Version)|SAMHSA

You Can Manage Your Chronic Pain To Live a Good Life: A Guide for People in Recovery from Mental Illness or Addiction (Spanish Version)|SAMHSA







You Can Manage Your Chronic Pain To Live a Good Life: A Guide for People in Recovery from Mental Illness or Addiction (Spanish Version)

Tu puedes controlar el dolor cronico para llevar una buena vida: Una guia para las personas en recuperacion por una enfermedad mental o una adiccion

Brochure - In Stock

Download Digital Version





You Can Manage Your Chronic Pain To Live a Good Life: A Guide for People in Recovery from Mental Illness or Addiction (Spanish Version)



Ofrece consejos a las personas que sufren de dolor crónico y tienen una enfermedad mental. Les explica cómo trabajar con sus proveedores de cuidados de la salud para disminuir su dolor sin perjudicar su recuperación. Explora la terapia cognitiva-conductual, el ejercicio y las terapias alternativas, así los como medicamentos.



Pub id: SMA14-4875

Publication Date: 11/2014

Last Reviewed: 10/23/2014

Popularity: 217 

Format: Brochure

Audience: Spanish Speakers, People in Treatment as Audience, People in Recovery as Audience 

You Can Manage Your Chronic Pain To Live a Good Life: A Guide for People in Recovery from Mental Illness or Addiction (Spanish Version)|SAMHSA

Affordable Care Act (ACA) Enrollment Assistance for LGBT Communities|SAMHSA

Affordable Care Act (ACA) Enrollment Assistance for LGBT Communities|SAMHSA



Affordable Care Act (ACA) Enrollment Assistance for LGBT Communities

A Resource for Behavioral Health Providers





Affordable Care Act (ACA) Enrollment Assistance for LGBT Communities



Guides health professionals in helping lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people understand health insurance options, particularly mental health and substance abuse benefits and services, under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and enroll in plans.



Pub id: PEP14-LGBTACAENROLL

Publication Date: 11/2014

Last Reviewed: 11/05/2014

Popularity: Not ranked 

Format: Resource Guide

Audience: Professional Care Providers, Public Health Professionals 

Population Group: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender

Affordable Care Act (ACA) Enrollment Assistance for LGBT Communities|SAMHSA