sábado, 25 de abril de 2015

Dengue in Malaysia - Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions - Travel Health Notices | Travelers' Health | CDC

Dengue in Malaysia - Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions - Travel Health Notices | Travelers' Health | CDC

CDC. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People.





Dengue in Malaysia

Warning - Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel
Alert - Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions
Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions

What is the current situation?

According to the World Health Organization, as of March 21, 2015, more than 30,800 cases of dengue fever, including 108 deaths, have been reported in Malaysia in 2015. This is a 41% increase in cases in 2015 compared with the same period for 2014.
Travelers to Malaysia should protect themselves against mosquito bites to avoid getting dengue.

What can travelers do to prevent dengue?

Learn more aboutdengue.
No vaccine or medicine can prevent dengue. Travelers can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.  
Prevent mosquito bites:
  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an insect repellent as directed.
  • Higher percentages of active ingredient provide longer protection. Use products with the following active ingredients:
    • DEET (products containing DEET include Off!, Cutter, Sawyer, and Ultrathon)
    • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin; products containing picaridin include Cutter Advanced, Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus, and Autan [outside the United States])
    • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or PMD (products containing OLE include Repel and Off! Botanicals)
    • IR3535 (products containing IR3535 include Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus Expedition and SkinSmart)
  • Always follow product directions and reapply as directed:
  • If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen first and insect repellent second.
  • Follow package directions when applying repellent on children. Avoid applying repellent to their hands, eyes, and mouth.
  • Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See the product information to find out how long the protection will last.
  • If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.
  • Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). You can buy pretreated clothing and gear or treat them yourself:
  • Stay and sleep in screened or air conditioned rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.
If you feel sick and think you may have dengue:
  • Talk to your doctor or nurse if you feel seriously ill, especially if you have a fever.

Traveler Information

Clinician Information


Ross River virus disease in Australia - Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions - Travel Health Notices | Travelers' Health | CDC

Ross River virus disease in Australia - Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions - Travel Health Notices | Travelers' Health | CDC



CDC. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People.



Ross River virus disease in Australia

Warning - Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel
Alert - Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions
Watch - Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions

What is the current situation?




According to the Department of Health in Australia, as of April 17, 2015, a total of 6,054 Ross River virus disease (RRVD) cases have been reported. This is the largest number of reported cases since 1996. Most cases have occurred in the city of Brisbane and the surrounding areas of the state of Queensland.
CDC recommends that travelers to Australia protect themselves from RRVD by preventing mosquito bites.

What is RRVD?

RRVD is spread through mosquito bites. About 55%–75% of people who are infected do not feel sick. For those who do feel sick, symptoms of RRVD include joint pain and swelling, muscle pain, fever, tiredness, and rash. Most patients recover within a few weeks, but some people experience joint pain, joint stiffness or tiredness for many months.
Travelers who plan to spend a lot of time outdoors or who will be in areas with a lot of mosquitoes are at increased risk of RRVD. Disease risk is likely to decrease with the colder weather during the coming winter months in Australia. Ross River virus infection is the most common mosquito-related infection in Australia.

What can travelers do to prevent RRVD?

No vaccine or medicine can prevent RRVD. The only way to prevent RRVD is to prevent mosquito bites.
  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent as directed.
  • Higher percentages of active ingredient provide longer protection. Use products with the following active ingredients:
    • DEET (Products containing DEET include Off!, Cutter, Sawyer, and Ultrathon)
    • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin products containing picaridin include Cutter Advanced, Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus, and Autan [outside the US])
    • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or PMD (Products containing OLE include Repel and Off! Botanicals)
    • IR3535  (Products containing IR3535 include Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus Expedition and SkinSmart)
  • Always follow product directions and reapply as directed.
  • If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen first and insect repellent second.
  • Follow package directions when applying repellent on children. Avoid applying repellent to their hands, eyes, and mouth.
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). You can buy pre-treated clothing and gear or treat them yourself:
  • Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See the product information to find out how long the protection will last.
  • If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.
  • Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in screened or air conditioned rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

If you feel sick and think you may have RRVD:

  • Talk to your doctor or nurse if you feel seriously ill, especially if you have a fever.

Traveler Information

Clinician Information


Headlines: New Report Shows Substance Use by Industry

Headlines: New Report Shows Substance Use by Industry



SAMHSA Headlines







Upcoming Events




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APR
Register to learn about the trends and the changing landscape of hepatitis C (HCV) among people who inject drugs, opportunities and challenges in HCV prevention, and more.
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APR
Join this webinar to hear from the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's Prioritized Research Task Force about the advances in engaging at-risk individuals and improving care transitions, and the research challenges that remain.
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This webinar will equip peer health educators with a background on intimate partner and sexual violence and healthy relationships, as well as tools and resources that they can use to start conversations with students around these issues.
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Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter and spoken word artist Mary Lambert will join SAMHSA to celebrate the 10th anniversary of National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day 2015 on Thursday, May 7 at 1:30 p.m. Eastern Time at the Lansburgh Theater in Washington, DC.

Headlines: New Report Shows Substance Use by Industry ► Nearly 1 in 10 Full-Time Workers Have Had a Substance Use Disorder in the Past Year

Headlines: New Report Shows Substance Use by Industry

SAMHSA Headlines



A new SAMHSA report indicates that 9.5 percent of full-time workers (ages 18 to 64) experienced a substance use disorder in the past year. Levels of substance use/dependence varied considerably among different industry categories.
A new SAMHSA report Tracking Heroin Use in the United States: 2002 to 2013 shows that while incidence of heroin use is still relatively small compared with other illicit substances (e.g., marijuana, prescription drug misuse), it rose significantly over the past 11 years.
The purpose of this program is to create and/or enhance statewide networks that improve access to and the quality of behavioral health systems, services, treatment, and recovery supports statewide.

SAMHSA’s Suicide Safe Recorded Press Conference


On March 11, 2015, SAMHSA hosted a press conference at the National Press Club to launch Suicide Safe, a suicide prevention application. Suicide Safe helps health care providers integrate suicide prevention strategies into their practice and address suicide risk among patients. The event described high national suicide rates and highlighted SAMHSA's suicide prevention programs and resources, while honoring the 10th anniversary of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

Protecting Our Kids' Health – With Help From a Furry Friend

Dept. of Health & Human Services
Apr 24, 2015
By: Sylvia Mathews Burwell, HHS Secretary
As parents and caregivers, we all feel a deep sense of responsibility toward our children. The first time I held my daughter and son, I knew I wanted to do everything I could to give them a healthy start in life. As they began to crawl, walk and play outside, I realized I couldn’t always stop them from getting scraped knees or stuffy noses. We know some risks are inevitable, but there is something every parent can do to protect their kids from getting some serious diseases. Just by getting my children their routine immunizations, I knew I could help them stay healthy in a big way, and in turn, help protect my community.
This week, communities across the country have been commemorating National Infant Immunization Week. Every year, we highlight the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and celebrate the positive impact immunizations have on the health of our children, families and communities.
Secretary Burwell and Elmo
READ MORE: Protecting Our Kids' Health – With Help From a Furry Friend
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Botox Update

Botox Update

Botox Update


New on the MedlinePlus Botox page:
04/20/2015 12:00 PM EDT

Doctors should closely examine wrinkle-reliever packaging
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Source: HealthDay