jueves, 28 de mayo de 2015

Thursday Health.mil News Round-Up: Education, diversity, service define careers of sibling naval officers; Getting Stronger as a Family with The UltimateMe PALA Challenge; When it all comes together

Thursday Health.mil News Round-Up: Education, diversity, service define careers of sibling naval officers; Getting Stronger as a Family with The UltimateMe PALA Challenge; When it all comes together







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Bono



Education, diversity, service define careers of sibling naval officers

Thirty-four years ago, a young student making her way through medical school on a military scholarship envisioned a career as a surgeon in private practice. Even after graduating from Texas Tech University with a naval commission and completing her residency at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth in Virginia, she assumed she would leave the military for life in the operating room. But things turned out quite differently for Rear Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) National Capital Region (NCR) Medical Directorate, and the 11th chief of the Navy Medical Corps. 

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PALA

Getting Stronger as a Family with The UltimateMe PALA+ Challenge

Congratulations to all the participants in The UltimateMe PALA+ Challenge on their three months of hard work! If you’ve already earned a Presidential Active Lifestyle Award by meeting the physical activity and nutrition requirements for six out of eight weeks of the program, way to go! If you’re still working toward a PALA+, there’s plenty of time to get it done! Summer is a great time to be active, whether it’s hiking in a nearby nature preserve or teaching your future Olympians how to do a cartwheel in your backyard. Remember that The UltimateMe PALA+ Challenge is open to your whole family, so make it a priority to get stronger together.”

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ASBP



When It All Comes Together

Armed Services Blood Program blood donor centers in the U.S., Germany, Japan and the Pacific were busy collecting blood donations from the military for the military. However, on this day at two blood drives separated by 2,070 miles, family members were donating at both the Madigan Army Medical Center on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington and the Navy Basic Training at the Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. Everybody was doing their part, and it all just came together. 

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New trial results: For people with HIV, early treatment improves outcomes

START

NIAID Logo
Wednesday May 27, 2015

Starting treatment early improves outcomes for HIV-infected individuals

HIV-infected T cell

A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner rather than later. Together with data from previous studies, these findings from the NIAID-funded trial support offering treatment to everyone with HIV.

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National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
http://www.niaid.nih.gov
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
Media Contact:
​NIAID Office of Communications
(301) 402-1663
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov


Starting Antiretroviral Treatment Early Improves Outcomes for
HIV-Infected Individuals

NIH-Funded Trial Results Likely Will Impact Global Treatment Guidelines

A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count—a key measure of immune system health—is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. Together with data from previous studies showing that antiretroviral treatment reduced the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sexual partners, these findings support offering treatment to everyone with HIV.

The new finding is from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, provided primary funding for the START trial. Though the study was expected to conclude at the end of 2016, an interim review of the study data by an independent data and safety monitoring board (DSMB) recommended that results be released early.

“We now have clear-cut proof that it is of significantly greater health benefit to an HIV-infected person to start antiretroviral therapy sooner rather than later,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “Moreover, early therapy conveys a double benefit, not only improving the health of individuals but at the same time, by lowering their viral load, reducing the risk they will transmit HIV to others. These findings have global implications for the treatment of HIV.”

“This is an important milestone in HIV research,” said Jens Lundgren, M.D., of the University of Copenhagen and one of the co-chairs of the START study. “We now have strong evidence that early treatment is beneficial to the HIV-positive person. These results support treating everyone irrespective of CD4+ T-cell count.”

The START study, which opened widely in March 2011, was conducted by the International Network for Strategic Initiatives in Global HIV Trials (INSIGHT) at 215 sites in 35 countries. The trial enrolled 4,685 HIV-infected men and women ages 18 and older, with a median age of 36. Participants had never taken antiretroviral therapy and were enrolled with CD4+ cell counts in the normal range—above 500 cells per cubic millimeter (cells/mm3). Approximately half of the study participants were randomized to initiate antiretroviral treatment immediately (early treatment), and the other half were randomized to defer treatment until their CD4+ cell count declined to 350 cells/mm3. On average, participants in the study were followed for three years.

The study measured a combination of outcomes that included serious AIDS events (such as AIDS-related cancer), serious non-AIDS events (major cardiovascular, renal and liver disease and cancer), and death. Based on data from March 2015, the DSMB found 41 instances of AIDS, serious non-AIDS events or death among those enrolled in the study’s early treatment group compared to 86 events in the deferred treatment group. The DSMB’s interim analysis found risk of developing serious illness or death was reduced by 53 percent among those in the early treatment group, compared to those in the deferred group.

Rates of serious AIDS-related events and serious non-AIDS-related events were both lower in the early treatment group than the deferred treatment group. The risk reduction was more pronounced for the AIDS-related events. Findings were consistent across geographic regions, and the benefits of early treatment were similar for participants from low- and middle-income countries and participants from high-income countries.

“The study was rigorous and the results are clear,” said INSIGHT principal investigator James D. Neaton, Ph.D., a professor of biostatistics at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. “The definitive findings from a randomized trial like START are likely to influence how care is delivered to millions of HIV-positive individuals around the world.” The University of Minnesota served as the trial’s regulatory sponsor and statistical and data management center.

Prior to the START trial, there was no randomized controlled trial evidence to guide initiating treatment for individuals with higher CD4+ cell counts. Previous evidence to support early treatment among HIV-positive people with CD4+ cell counts above 350 was limited to data from non-randomized trials or observational cohort studies, and on expert opinion.

START is the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to offer concrete scientific evidence to support the current U.S. HIV treatment guidelines, which recommend that all asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals take antiretrovirals, regardless of CD4+ cell count. Current World Health Organization HIV treatment guidelines recommend that HIV-infected individuals begin antiretroviral therapy when CD4+ cell counts fall to 500 cells/mm3 or less.

In light of the DSMB findings, study investigators are informing all participants of the interim results. Participants will be offered treatment if they are not already on antiretroviral therapy, and they will continue to be followed through 2016.

The HIV medicines used in the trial are approved medications donated by AbbVie, Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline/ViiV Healthcare, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.

In addition to NIAID, funding for the START trial came from other NIH entities, including the National Cancer Institute; the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute; the National Institute of Mental Health; the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; the NIH Clinical Center; and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Funding was also provided by the National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS) in France, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany, the European AIDS Treatment Network and government organizations based in Australia, Denmark, and the United Kingdom.

The Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London; the Copenhagen HIV Program at the Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen in Denmark; the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia; and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center affiliated with George Washington University in Washington, D.C. coordinated the work of the 215 START sites.

For more information about the START trial, see the Questions and Answers or visit ClinicalTrials.gov using study identifierNCT00867048.

NIAID conducts and supports research—at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide—to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID website.
About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.


NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ®

NHLBI Funding & Research Opportunities and Announcements for May 27, 2015

NHLBI_Standard_Sig_Logo_RGB - New

Funding and Research Opportunities

The following funding opportunity announcements from the NHLBI or other components of the National Institutes of Health, might be of interest:

Notices:

  • Notice of Participation of NIDA in PAR-15-189 "Lasker Clinical Research Scholars Program Si2/R00"
    (NOT-DA-15-070)
    National Institute on Drug Abuse

Starting antiretroviral treatment early improves outcomes for HIV-infected individuals - NIH study

Starting antiretroviral treatment early improves outcomes for HIV-infected individuals - NIH study



National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Turning Discovery Into Health



Institute/Center

Contact



Starting antiretroviral treatment early improves outcomes for HIV-infected individuals

NIH-funded trial results likely will impact global treatment guidelines
A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count—a key measure of immune system health—is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. Together with data from previous studies showing that antiretroviral treatment reduced the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sexual partners, these findings support offering treatment to everyone with HIV.
The new finding is from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, provided primary funding for the START trial. Though the study was expected to conclude at the end of 2016, an interim review of the study data by an independent data and safety monitoring board (DSMB) recommended that results be released early.
“These findings have global implications for the treatment of HIV.”
— Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.
NIAID Director
“We now have clear-cut proof that it is of significantly greater health benefit to an HIV-infected person to start antiretroviral therapy sooner rather than later,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “Moreover, early therapy conveys a double benefit, not only improving the health of individuals but at the same time, by lowering their viral load, reducing the risk they will transmit HIV to others. These findings have global implications for the treatment of HIV.”
“This is an important milestone in HIV research,” said Jens Lundgren, M.D., of the University of Copenhagen and one of the co-chairs of the START study. “We now have strong evidence that early treatment is beneficial to the HIV-positive person. These results support treating everyone irrespective of CD4+ T-cell count.”
The START study, which opened widely in March 2011, was conducted by the International Network for Strategic Initiatives in Global HIV Trials (INSIGHT) at 215 sites in 35 countries. The trial enrolled 4,685 HIV-infected men and women ages 18 and older, with a median age of 36. Participants had never taken antiretroviral therapy and were enrolled with CD4+ cell counts in the normal range — above 500 cells per cubic millimeter (cells/mm3). Approximately half of the study participants were randomized to initiate antiretroviral treatment immediately (early treatment), and the other half were randomized to defer treatment until their CD4+ cell count declined to 350 cells/mm3. On average, participants in the study were followed for three years.
The study measured a combination of outcomes that included serious AIDS events (such as AIDS-related cancer), serious non-AIDS events (major cardiovascular, renal and liver disease and cancer), and death. Based on data from March 2015, the DSMB found 41 instances of AIDS, serious non-AIDS events or death among those enrolled in the study’s early treatment group compared to 86 events in the deferred treatment group. The DSMB’s interim analysis found risk of developing serious illness or death was reduced by 53 percent among those in the early treatment group, compared to those in the deferred group.
Rates of serious AIDS-related events and serious non-AIDS-related events were both lower in the early treatment group than the deferred treatment group. The risk reduction was more pronounced for the AIDS-related events. Findings were consistent across geographic regions, and the benefits of early treatment were similar for participants from low- and middle-income countries and participants from high-income countries.
“The study was rigorous and the results are clear,” said INSIGHT principal investigator James D. Neaton, Ph.D., a professor of biostatistics at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. “The definitive findings from a randomized trial like START are likely to influence how care is delivered to millions of HIV-positive individuals around the world.” The University of Minnesota served as the trial’s regulatory sponsor and statistical and data management center.
Prior to the START trial, there was no randomized controlled trial evidence to guide initiating treatment for individuals with higher CD4+ cell counts. Previous evidence to support early treatment among HIV-positive people with CD4+ cell counts above 350 was limited to data from non-randomized trials or observational cohort studies, and on expert opinion.
START is the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to offer concrete scientific evidence to support the current U.S. HIV treatment guidelines, which recommend that all asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals take antiretrovirals, regardless of CD4+ cell count. Current World Health Organization HIV treatment guidelines recommend that HIV-infected individuals begin antiretroviral therapy when CD4+ cell counts fall to 500 cells/mm3 or less.
In light of the DSMB findings, study investigators are informing all participants of the interim results. Participants will be offered treatment if they are not already on antiretroviral therapy, and they will continue to be followed through 2016.
The HIV medicines used in the trial are approved medications donated by AbbVie, Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline/ViiV Healthcare, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.
In addition to NIAID, funding for the START trial came from other NIH entities, including the National Cancer Institute; the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute; the National Institute of Mental Health; the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; the NIH Clinical Center; and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Funding was also provided by the National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS) in France, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany, the European AIDS Treatment Network and government organizations based in Australia, Denmark, and the United Kingdom.
The Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London; the Copenhagen HIV Program at the Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen in Denmark; the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia; and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center affiliated with George Washington University in Washington, D.C. coordinated the work of the 215 START sites.
For more information about the START trial, see the Questions and Answers or visit ClinicalTrials.gov using study identifier NCT00867048.
NIAID conducts and supports research—at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide—to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID website athttp://www.niaid.nih.gov.
About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.
NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health®
###

miércoles, 27 de mayo de 2015

Tomorrow, May 28, Join the NHLBI's Asthma Awareness Twitter Chat with U.S. News

Invitation to participate in an asthma Twitter chat on May 28 at 2 pm ET with NHLBI and US News

Food Safety for Power Outages | FoodSafety.gov

Food Safety for Power Outages | FoodSafety.gov

FoodSafety.gov



Whether you lose power from a hurricane, tornado, wind storm, downed tree, or flood, food safety during severe weather is often the same.  If your power goes out, you should know how to keep the food in your refrigerator and freezer safe.  Read our latest blog for easy to follow tips to save money and keep your family safe from food poisoning when the power is out.



Infographic of Food safety tips for before, during and after a power outage

Five named to NIAMS Advisory Council - NIH study

Five named to NIAMS Advisory Council - NIH study



National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Turning Discovery Into Health

Institute/Center

Contact

Five named to NIAMS Advisory Council

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health, has appointed five new members to its advisory council. The council comprises scientific and lay members who have expertise in the mission areas of the institute. Council members provide advice to the institute on broad policy issues, and make recommendations on research proposals.
Joan E. Bechtold, Ph.D., is the Gustilo Professor of Orthopaedic Research and Graduate Professor in Orthopaedic Surgery and Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dr. Bechtold’s research focuses on bone healing in the context of challenges such as infection, trauma, smoking, and joint replacement. She is particularly interested in developing new bone/implant interfaces to improve outcomes for patients who have revision joint replacement surgeries. She has been an NIH grantee since 1995, and has served on various NIH study sections. Dr. Bechtold is actively involved in professional organizations such as the Orthopaedic Research Society, where she currently holds the position of immediate past president.
Photo of new 2015 NIAMS Advisory Council members.
NIAMS Director Dr. Stephen Katz (second from l) and Deputy Director Dr. Robert Carter (third from r) welcome new members to the institute’s council. They are (from l) Richard Seiden, Dr. V. Michael Holers, Dr. Amy Paller, Dr. Joan Bechtold, and Dr. Sundeep Khosla.
V. Michael Holers, M.D., is the Scoville Professor of Rheumatology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, where he also is head of the Division of Rheumatology. His research interests include B lymphocyte activation and development; the role of substances known as complement in inflammation and autoimmunity; early-stage autoimmune-related changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and the causes and development of RA and related conditions. Dr. Holers is a member of various scientific and professional organizations, including the Arthritis Foundation and the Lupus Research Institute.
Sundeep Khosla, M.D., is the Dr. Francis Chucker and Nathan Landow Research Professor, a Mayo Foundation Distinguished Investigator, and the dean for clinical and translational science at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota. As principal investigator on a number of NIH grants, Dr. Khosla’s research projects include investigating the mechanisms of bone loss in women and in men, sex hormone action on bone, and the biology of osteoprogenitor cells (those involved in the growth or repair of bone) and stem cells. He is a former president of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, and currently serves as the chair of the Governance Committee of the National Bone Health Alliance.
Amy S. Paller, M.D., is the Walter J. Hamlin Professor and chair of the Department of Dermatology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago. She is also the director of skin-related clinical research at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. As a pediatric dermatologist, Dr. Paller specializes in clinical research related to genetic and immune-mediated inflammatory conditions in children, and currently is studying eczema, psoriasis, localized scleroderma, and epidermolysis bullosa. She is a former president of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.
Richard F. Seiden, J.D., is a partner with Foley and Lardner, L.L.P., in Los Angeles, and has been a member of the California Bar since 1973. His experience includes serving as outside general counsel to major nonprofit hospital systems, and assisting clients in the development of integrated healthcare delivery systems in a managed care environment. Mr. Seiden joins the council as a public representative. He is a former chair of the board of trustees of the National Psoriasis Foundation.
The mission of the NIAMS, a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Institutes of Health, is to support research into the causes, treatment and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. For more information about the NIAMS, call the information clearinghouse at (301) 495-4484 or (877) 22-NIAMS (free call) or visit the NIAMS website at http://www.niams.nih.gov.
About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.
NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health®
###